Inference | Reading

May 16, 2016 Jennifer Brandt

Inference | Reading 

As you prepare for the TASC Test Assessing Secondary Completion™ Reading subtest, it’s crucial that you practice and understand how to infer – an important reading comprehension skill.

An inference is an answer or conclusion that you reach based on evidence and reasoning. In other words, when you read a passage of text and use clues from the passage to figure something out that the author doesn’t directly state, you’re making an inference.

Inference Equation 

According to TeachersPayTeachers.com, the following equation illustrates how to make an inference:

Inference Examples

Now that you understand what inference is, use the inference equation to work through these three inference examples:

  1. Mary came home from work looking tired. She sat on the chair, slowly took off her shoes, and said to her husband, “I had a long night at work and my feet are killing me. We had three emergencies come in back-to-back, and one operation lasted over two hours.”

You can infer that:

  1. Mary works in the medical field.
  2. Mary had to have surgery on her feet.
  3. Mary doesn’t like her job.

2. Phil was driving on the highway, singing to his favorite song on the radio, and not paying attention to his speed. All of the sudden, Phil noticed the red and blue flashing lights of a cop car behind him. He was being signaled to pull over.

You can infer that:

         a. Phil is getting pulled over because he didn’t stop at a stop sign.

b. Phil is getting pulled over because he was speeding.

c. Phil is getting pulled over because he stole the car.

3. Jenny walked into class as the teacher exclaimed, “Please find your seat and put all books and backpacks under your chair. Please take out one piece of paper and a pencil.”

You can infer that:

         a. Jenny is in detention.

         b. Jenny forgot her pencil in her locker.

         c. A pop quiz is about to be given.

Answers:

  1. You can infer that Mary works in the medical field.
  2. You can infer that Phil is getting pulled over because he was speeding.
  3. You can infer that a pop quiz is about to be given.

Want to learn more about inference and practice with more inference examples? Visit TestPrep.About.com to find helpful tips and strategies to strengthen your inferring skills. 

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